Curriculum Overarching Statement - The Three I's

Ofsted's working definition of the curriculum
“The curriculum is a framework for setting out the aims of a
programme of education, including the knowledge and skills to
be gained at each stage (intent); for translating that framework
over time into a structure and narrative, within an institutional
context (implementation) and for evaluating what
knowledge and skills pupils have gained against expectations(impact/achievement).”

St. Vincent's Catholic Primary School  Curriculum Statement

 

 

Curriculum Intent

 

Intention 1: Developing the learning (What we learn)

To provide high quality teaching, developing the appropriate subject specific knowledge, skills and understanding, and a well-resourced rich environment so that pupils can learn effectively, fulfil their potential and bring about outstanding outcomes.

Intention 2: Developing the character of our learners (Who we are when we learn) 

To provide a broad, balanced, modern and well-resourced curriculum to include first hand experiences, in order to fulfil the requirements of the national curriculum, modern life and a changing technological world.

Intention 3: Developing behaviours and habits to become effective learners (Our actions and attitudes: How we act when we learn)

To develop a growth mind set approach to learning so that pupils are resilient learners who recognise that their effort is key to their success and develop independent learning skills as pupils progress through the school.

Our pupils will have a healthy self-image, self-esteem and self-confidence. They will develop high levels of resilience and develop the life skills necessary to deal with everyday life. We will adopt the 5 ways to wellbeing and understand the importance of each one – Connect, Be Active, Take Notice, Learn, Give.

Intention 4: Developing the spiritual and moral compass of our learners (Our place in the community and wider world: Where we are)

To develop the whole child by providing a broad and balanced curriculum in order to empower pupils to be engaged and creative lifelong learners who can contribute to the wider society.  Our pupils will live out our catholic mission by responding to social justice and local, national and international charitable work.

 

Curriculum Implementation

Our curriculum will be implemented with our intentions as the driving force behind our actions.  By ensuring we think about what we learn, who we are when we are learning, how we act when we learn and who we are in the world, we build happy, resilient, successful, good citizens. Our implementation plan ensures our curriculum keeps us focused on these areas.

Intention 1: Developing our  learning (What we learn)

Our promise to our learners: In addition to learning through the national curriculum (and of equal importance), we promise our pupils a breadth of experiences throughout their journey at St. Vincent’s. These are our ‘promises’. Examples include: providing a range of enrichment and extra-curricular activities; leading the charitable work in the school as Mini Vinnies; arranging educational visits and speakers of different cultures, faith and experiences to share about their way of life; promoting and protecting emotional wellbeing and mental health; offering pupil leadership opportunities, prefects, ECO club, junior leadership team, wellbeing ambassadors, digital leaders, school councillors

Maths – We use the White Rose Hub mastery schemes of work, alongside Abacus textbooks for progression. We assess using testbase materials, teacher assessment and PUMA tests throughout the year. We use a range of online resources to support learning including ActiveLearn, MyMaths and Times Tables Rock Stars.

Writing – We look at comprehension skills, spelling, grammar and punctuation skills, writing planning and extended writing each week, to give us a regular routine that helps us build up competency. We assess using writing assessment grids and moderate across the year group and with the year group below/above. We work hard on handwriting and presentation, and edit our work carefully to improve it. We celebrate writing across the school. In line with our Environmental Plan, every classroom has a ‘We are improving our writing’ display.

Reading – We read with children in groups during guided reading sessions, using a progressive reading scheme covering all genres. We visit our own school library each week and choose our own book to read for pleasure, as well as accessing a progressive reading scheme to help us with reading at home. Learners need the space and time to make choices about books, and to discover authors and texts they might not get chance to look at outside of school. Our teachers check we are reading books that will challenge us, and create exciting reading areas around the school. We assess reading using testbase, teacher assessment and PiRA tests and use the Salford Sentence Reading Test.

Religious Education –  We use the Diocesan approved scheme of work 'The Way, the Truth and the Life'.  This includes 6 topics per year group from Reception to Year 6. Subject leaders deliver training to staff to enhance teaching and learning in Religious Education as a result of specialist training that they have received. All children participate in pupil-led and teacher-led Collective Worship sessions as well as taking part in assemblies, Masses and liturgies. Children are encouraged to take opportunities to express their faith through various school organisations such as The School Council, Eco Warriors, Well-Being Ambassadors and Mini Vinnies.

Foundation subjects –We plan foundation subjects using progressive skills, which show what children should be learning in each year group in each subject. Teachers check children’s learning against these progressive skills and subject leaders check that they are doing this correctly. Subject Leaders keep a record of how each class is doing and monitor the progress of pupils. Our curriculum encourages children to develop independent thinking skills and questioning. Our teachers plan a wide variety of educational visits including: residentials, school trips and guest speakers. Teachers also plan exciting focus weeks and events like: Science week, History Day and United Nations Day. Where possible cross curricular links are made between Maths, English and Foundation Subjects. We assess the foundation subjects using assessment grids with the National Curriculum objectives referenced.

Intention 2: Developing the character of our learners (Who we are when we learn) 

We empower our pupils to be engaged and creative lifelong learners who can contribute to the wider society.  Our pupils live out our catholic mission by responding to social justice and local, national and international charitable work.

Our school believes in and celebrates the uniqueness of every child, as created in the image of God. The example of Christ’s love and care, shown by St Vincent de Paul, is encouraged through every aspect of school life. This is developed in partnership with parents, the parishes and the wider community.

We follow our school mission of ‘Let your Light Shine’ which inspires us to be the best we can be academically, spiritually and socially. We recognise the multi-cultural, multi faith and ever-changing nature of the United Kingdom. We promote and uphold the key ‘British Values’ 

  • Democracy
  • The rule of law
  • Individual liberty
  • Mutual respect
  • Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs

Teachers ask learners to undertake positions of responsibility around the school, as we believe that children understand values by seeing them in action in others.

Intention 3: Developing behaviours and habits to become effective learners (How we act when we learn)

Our pupils develop a growth mind set approach from the earliest opportunities in school, so that they are resilient learners, who recognise that their effort is key to their success. They understand that they can improve through hard work, the use of effective strategies, and help from others when needed. They are not afraid to make mistakes and learn from them.

Our pupils understand the importance of wellbeing and good mental health and its impact on our learning. They know who to speak to if they need support and that looking after their mental health is as important as looking after their physical health. They know about the ‘5 ways to wellbeing’ and understand the importance of each one – Connect, Be Active, Take Notice, Learn, Give.

When teachers design learning opportunities, they look for ways for children to develop good learning behaviours.

Our teachers notice when learners are showing positive learning behaviours. They award certificates for this in our weekly assembly. When children work as a team, they collect marbles and spotted tickets/golden tickets that earn a prize. Teachers send postcards to parents when they notice exemplary behaviour or improvements or effort in learning and they are awarded bronze cards and silver and gold notes in line with our school behaviour policy ‘Stay on Green’.

Intention 4: Developing the spiritual and moral compass of our learners (Our place in the community and wider world: Where we are)

When teachers plan the curriculum, they think not just about what pupils should learn and how pupils should learn it, but also how they can bring in an understanding of spirituality, morality and the wider world. Teachers do this through:

  • Our daily life as learners in a Catholic School; our ethos, our mission and through prayer and our Religious Education scheme ‘ The Way, The Truth and The Life’. Children take part in acts of collective worship in the classroom, in class assemblies and at Mass.
  • Teaching children the weekly PSHE curriculum using the ‘Jigsaw’ scheme. Children learn about ‘being me in my world’, ‘celebrating difference’, ‘dreams and goals’, ‘healthy me’, ‘relationships and changing me’. This helps the children understand their place in the world.
  • Ensuring that in half termly learning, they think about how to challenge stereotypes. For example when they learn about toys, teachers ask learners “Do we have girls' and boys' toys?”; when children learn cooking skills, teachers encourage children to think about who prepares the food in their own homes. Children learn about slavery, both historical and modern, thinking about why it happens and what motivates this. Teachers identify positive role models that challenge stereotypes for children to learn about.
  • Inviting in people from local groups to tell us about their faith. We work with local religious groups to get a good understanding of the beliefs of others.
  • We work alongside local community groups, we visit the local residential home, work with local charities by collecting and raising money for charities and work with other schools. We aim to increase our learners’ engagement with activities that benefit other members of the community and beyond.

 

Curriculum Impact

What do we hope will be the impact of our curriculum and how do we measure it?

Intention 1: Developing our learner’s learning (What we learn)

We strive to ensure that our children’s attainment in RE, core and foundation subjects is in line with or exceeding their potential when we consider the varied starting points of children. We measure this carefully using a range of materials, but always considering age related expectations. Our aim is to ensure that children will be academically and socially prepared for life in high school and in modern Britain and the world.

Intention 2: Developing the character of our learners (Who we are when we learn) 

The impact will be that our learners will have a clear understanding of our core values and our mission as pupils in our school and as they move on in each stage of their life. This will prepare them for life in the wider community, demonstrating tolerance and equality. We measure this not just by the work our children produce, but in the behaviours we see each and every day in all learners. The impact of this intention is seen in the daily interaction of all members of our community, including staff and children.

Intention 3: Developing behaviours and habits to become effective learners (Our actions and attitudes: How we act when we learn)

The impact is seen by how pupils approach challenges every day. This could be on the playground, in a game or disagreement, or in class in a complex learning challenge. The impact should be that children don’t give up, are highly motivated to succeed and achieve and are equipped with all the personal skills to do this.

Children will be able to express how they are feeling and know how/where to get support if needed. They will apply the 5 ways to wellbeing, understanding the importance of each one – Connect, Be Active, Take Notice, Learn, Give.

Intention 4: Developing the moral compass of our learners (Our place in the community and wider world: Where we are)

Our learners will be motivated by a strong personal sense of spirituality and morality. They will make decisions for the right reasons and in the best interests of their community, guided by their faith. Our learners will be happy and resilient, and the impact will be that they make a positive contribution to society and to modern Britain.  They will leave this school ready for the next phase of their education and go out into the world and make a difference in their own life and to others.

 

 

 

Contact the School

St Vincent's Catholic Primary School

Orchard Road
Altrincham
Cheshire
WA15 8EY

Main Contact: Headteacher Mrs Harrop

Tel: 0161 911 8040
admin@stvincents.trafford.sch.uk

Testimonials

We couldn’t be happier with St Vincent’s, our children are really happy there. - Parent Survey
It is a wonderful environment, our children are flourishing - Parent Survey
The school ethos gives the children excellent opportunities to develop their spirituality and knowledge of their faith. - Parent Survey
It is a really friendly school, I have been made to feel very welcome. - Parent Survey
We love St Vincent’s, keep doing what you are doing! - Parent Survey